eleanor eddison-cogan
+
greekstatues:

Jac Jagaciak for Marfa Journal by Joachim Johnson
+
style-inspo:

Daria Werbowy for Equipment
+
aestatestudio:

We share our passion for home design and great architecture. Learn more on www.aestate.be
+

Franz Kafka’s signature in a letter to Milena Jesenská. It reads:
Franz wrong,  F  wrong, Yours wrongnothing more, calm, deep forest
Prague, July 29, 1920.
Kafka and Jesenská met twice: once in Vienna for four days, and in Gmünd for one. Kafka gave her his diaries at the end of his life.
+
aestatestudio:

We share our passion for home design and great architecture. Learn more on www.aestate.be
+
weissesrauschen:

Pilotless Aircraft Research Division by NASA on The Commons on Flickr.
+

Maija Lisa Komulainen, 1954
+
+
nhmcelroy:

2014
+
whyallcaps:

by Benjamin Askinas
+
+
aestatestudio:

We share our passion for home design and great architecture. Learn more on www.aestate.be
+
aestatestudio:

We share our passion for home design and great architecture. Learn more on www.aestate.be
+
bodyfluids:

"Cold Comfort" for Vogue UK September 2014, ph. Craig Mcdean
+
weissesrauschen:

artfoal:

theblackisreallywhite:

misoxymorons:

bacchae:

Rhythm 0, 1974
To test the limits of the relationship between performer and audience, Abramović developed one of her most challenging (and best-known) performances. She assigned a passive role to herself, with the public being the force which would act on her.
Abramović had placed upon a table 72 objects that people were allowed to use (a sign informed them) in any way that they chose. Some of these were objects that could give pleasure, while others could be wielded to inflict pain, or to harm her. Among them were scissors, a knife, a whip, and, most notoriously, a gun and a single bullet. For six hours the artist allowed the audience members to manipulate her body and actions.
Initially, members of the audience reacted with caution and modesty, but as time passed (and the artist remained impassive) several people began to act quite aggressively. As Abramović described it later:
“The experience I learned was that…if you leave decision to the public, you can be killed.” … “I felt really violated: they cut my clothes, stuck rose thorns in my stomach, one person aimed the gun at my head, and another took it away. It created an aggressive atmosphere. After exactly 6 hours, as planned, I stood up and started walking toward the public. Everyone ran away, escaping an actual confrontation.”  

(via sagebrown)



(via delusionbox-deactivated20131118)